Featured

Wine Code Breaker #370

2017 Garden of Earthly Delights (by Syrahmi) Nebbiolo, Heathcote, Victoria

The “Nebb Off” highlights are completed with a comparison of the fruits. As with all grapes, the flavours will be a function of place and season. The warmer the climate, the fuller and rounder the fruits will be. The cooler will be finer, perhaps more elegant. With Nebbiolo, you still get to see the tar, leather and earth, but you may also see variations around the red fruits and the spectrum they can splay before you.

The 2017 Garden of Earthly Delights Nebbiolo is from Heathcote in Victoria. A lightly coloured crimson wine as it splashes as alluring as the first apple offered to man. The nose has leather and earth entwined through a mix of sarsaparilla and cherries. Some oak deftly placed in the background. The palate has the tannins and acid pulling against each other yet appearing to act in union. The raspberry is less cola, yet highly appealing against the cherries and tar presenting a long lingering finish.

Enjoy!

Rating: 94 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 13.8%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $37

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #369

2018 Prōterō Gumeracha (by SC Pannell) Nebbiolo, Adelaide Hills, South Australia

The “Nebb Off” highlights continue where a comparison of tannins can be made. Nebbiolo tannins are inherently obvious and if mishandled, will dominate to deliver a chunky and chewy wine that will just not soften. Handled deftly, the tannins will balance the fruit and acid, giving you something to sip and marvel at.

The 2018 Prōterō Gumeracha (by SC Pannell) is a Nebbiolo from Adelaide Hills in South Australia. A light crimson-coloured wine leads into a nose that has tar and leather, delightfully contrasting the cherry fruits. Of course the tannins are firm, yet dance lightly across the palate where the acidity is the seesaw that teeters the cherries, cola and sarsaparilla. Lovely persistence that is a marvel.

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 14%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $35

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #368

2017 Mac Forbes EB40 Flaming Nebbiolo, Yarra Valley, Victoria

Ever heard of a “Nebb Off?” No? Let me explain. With the increased interest in Australian Nebbiolo, a “Nebb Off” is a flight of wines at a tasting that are, of course, Nebbiolo. A recent “Nebb Off” allowed for a comparison of Nebbiolo across three different regions. Needless to say, this was good fun with a highlight below.

The 2017 Mac Forbes EB40 Flaming Nebbiolo is from the Yarra Valley in Victoria and is a light cerise in colour. The nose of the Experimental Batch is perfumed, herbal with leather and earth. The palate sees the leather paired with tobacco, earth, and coffee beans on a tapestry of firm tannins, stitched together by crunchy acidity making it a “Nebb Off” standout.

Enjoy!

Rating: 94 pts

Closure: Cork

Alc: 13.5%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $40

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #367

2020 Spinifex Garçon Grenache, Barossa Valley, South Australia 

Spinifex is a grass that is critical in holding back coastal foredunes from erosion in a harsh environment.  It appears delicate, yet can withstand much of what mother nature can throw at it.  It covers the surface of the dune and can be severely impacted by one storm, yet resilient enough to bounce back from the large swells that can pound the sand.  Human pedestrian traffic though can cause irreparable damage, so best to tread carefully along the dunes.  Spinifex is also the name of a winery that produces fine delicate wines from an environment that could be called harsh. They too are resilient, robust and tendered with care for us to marvel at.

The 2020 Spinifex Garçon Grenache is from the Barossa Valley in South Australia.   It is a beautiful light crimson-coloured wine.  The nose is perfumed of raspberry and spice with hints of graphite, earth and white and grey peppers.  The palate is delicate, with red fruits including raspberries, red currants and pomegranates. Dry spices and white peppers float easily across the palate with fine emery board tannins that along with the flavours lap gently against the dunes for a long, peaceful and lingering finish.

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 14%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $30

Tasted: May 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #366

2017 La Petite Mort Marsanne, Granite Belt, Queensland 

La Petite Mort is the celebrated album by James, a British rock band.  Incidentally, my favourite song from this group is Getting Away With It (All Messed Up) but that is another story.  This album is influenced by the recent deaths of a family member and friend of the band.  The lyrics of the album could be described as confronting, polarising, a conversation piece.  La Petite Mort is also the name of a small batch winery that produces wines that could also be described as confronting, polarising, a conversation piece. 

The 2017 La Petite Mort Marsanne is from the Granite Belt wine region in Queensland.  It is a bright, light green tinged wine.  The nose is a touch confronting with nashi pear, honey and lanolin.  It may polarise some, but it moves into a conversation piece with the palate.  Those nashi fruits shine with crunchy textural features mingling with some green fruit notes.  A lovely, expressive wine where the melons, minerals and honey drive the persistence.  Confronting, polarising, a conversation piece, and this makes me walk like you.

Enjoy!

Rating: 90 pts

Closure: Diam

Alc: 12%

Drink: Now; 3-7 yrs

Price: $36

Tasted: April 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #364

2019 Shadowfax Mondeuse Noir, Port Phillip, Victoria 

Mt Blanc in France is the highest mountain in the Alps of Europe.  In its shadows is the Savoie wine region of France.  This is the home to the Mondeuse Noir (or Noire) grape that the Gaul’s claimed “ripens amongst the snow.”  Then there is Werribee, located within the Port Phillip wine region it has one of Australia’s largest plantings of Mondeuse.  It has been in Australia for over 100 years but you wouldn’t really have known. It has been seen more as a blending variety elevating the acid and colour.  More recently, this grape is being showcased on its own to highlight its rustic and acid driven characteristics.  

The 2019 Shadowfax Mondeuse Noir from the Port Phillip region in Victoria is a bright ruby purple coloured wine.  The nose is instantly herbal followed by blackberries, spices, black olives as the savoury element and orange zest giving it a real appeal.  The palate has the dark fruits and black olives coming through mingling with a somewhat sappy crunchiness to the tannins.  The acidity brings it into balance and is better with a rustic plate of charcuterie and breads. This is not a wine for all, but is one of interest and worth trying. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 90 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 13%

Drink: Now; 3-7yrs

Price: $34

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #363

2020 Giant Steps Wombat Creek Pinot Noir, Yarra Valley, Victoria 

Hello Possums! Dame Edna Everage is our beloved megastar who is like no other. Hailing from Moonee Ponds, our Dame’s life experiences are something to marvel at. Her love of gladioli and outfits, whilst teetering on the fine line of outlandish and stylish, pale in comparison to her personality and cutting insight. She is sorry, but she cares. I have heard rumours Gladysdale in the Yarra Valley is a spiritual retreat for our megastar housewife for it is close to Wombat Creek. Why, this is the highest vineyard in the Yarra Valley and produces some stunning wines that are fit for our megastar and ourselves.

The 2020 Giant Steps Wombat Creek Pinot Noir from the Yarra Valley in Victoria wears a bright crimson colour with remarkable ease. The nose balances out Edna’s gladioli with its cherry perfume, red fruits that are tending toward pomegranates, earth and soft spices of the oak. It is a gentle creature on the palate with elegant splaying of the red and cherry fruits across a bed of red rose petals, savoury spices and cedary tones. The velvety texture counter balances the crisp acidity to deliver a beautiful fanning tail that leaves you aglow.

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 13%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $60

Tasted: April 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #362

2016 Printhie Super Duper Chardonnay, Orange, New South Wales 

The Orange wine region is located about 300km due West of Sydney.  It is an elevated landscape that belies its altitude.  Dominated by Mount Canobolis as there is nothing higher to the West.  A cool climate region that is relatively new, yet producing some stunning wines with pure fruit and regional zing. 

The 2016 Printhie Super Duper Chardonnay from Orange in New South Wales is a bright golden coloured wine.  The nose appeals instantly with its peaches, cumquat and other citrus elements.  There is oatmeal and honey with a touch of caramel.  The palate has the citrus, nuts and white peaches.  It is a complex palate with a creamy texture that provides its persistence.  It is cool, it is elevated, it is zinging with deliciousness. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 12.5%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $85

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #361

2019 Fighting Gully Road Sangiovese, Beechworth, Victoria 

The making of wine is a process that clashes the technical with creativity and music can help meld the two together to deliver something delicious.  I have recently wondered if you had a winery located in a former lunatic asylum, would you play Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon on repeat?  This seminal album begins with a heartbeat and takes the listener on an immersive experience through the various stages of life before ending with a heartbeat.  The themes explored within the album would no doubt relate well to the vintage process as there will be ups and downs along the way.  A glass of Sangiovese from Beechworth made in an abandoned lunatic asylum is perhaps a worthy accompaniment to this wonderfully thought provoking album.

*Heartbeat* The 2019 Fighting Gully Road Sangiovese from Beechworth in Victoria also contains a small amount of Colorino.  Speak to me is what you will think of the dark crimson coloured wine in your glass as you raise it to your nose.  Breathe (in the air) from the glass and cherries will appear on the run with a wow of raspberries, herbs and dried flowers.  With time, there is a delicate and lively balsamic note that may metaphorically send you to the great gig in the sky.  The palate though is where the money is; the cherries and balsamic will have you thinking us and them thoughts as the savoury thread, herbs and spices present as any colour you like.  A little espresso may appear to give you brain damage as you start remembering games and daisy chains and laughs.  It is without doubt the winemaker kept the loonies on the path as the gravelly tannins and crisp acidity drives its persistence that is this glass’s eclipse.  I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon with a Fighting Gully Road Sangiovese.  *Heartbeat*

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 14%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $30

Tasted: January 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #360

2016 Castagna la Chiave Sangiovese, Beechworth, Victoria 

Regions that have been put on the map by some wonderful examples of Shiraz are now being put back on the map, or their spot on the map is enlarged, with Italian varieties. Beechworth is one. A region founded on golden known for its cool climate Shiraz, you could say is now being re-pegged for Sangiovese. This region’s cool climate, a bit of elevation and dry Summers combining with the grape deliver flavours with sharp acidity that builds the wine. 

The 2016 Castagna la Chiave Sangiovese from Beechworth in Victoria is a bright crimson coloured wine.  The nose acts as a key opening with balsamic and leather moving through to cherries, blueberries, herbs and a little bit of tomato.  On the palate, the entrance expands with espresso and cola notes mingling with plums, cherries and leather.  These flavours are highly attractive on a mid weight palate, yet the golden nugget is its gravelly tannins complimenting the lively acidity that suggests this grape has a firm place in the region’s future. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 94 pts

Closure: Diam

Alc: 13.5%

Drink: Now; 5-10 yrs

Price: $75

Tasted: February 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #359

2019 Singlefile Family Reserve Chardonnay, Great Southern, Western Australia 

The Zephyr of Great Southern has struck again.  This Mistress of the Winds plays with the steep hills and valleys of the region and the Great Southern Ocean to deliver moisture laden breezes that cool the winters and warm the dry summers.  The vines grown on gravelly sandy loams benefit greatly to produce deeply flavoured grapes with crisp acidity. Chardonnay is a highlight of this region.  

The 2019 Singlefile Family Reserve Chardonnay from the Denmark area of Great Southern in Western Australia is a bright, lightly golden-coloured wine.  The nose is gloriously complex with freshly sliced peaches sprinkled with grapefruit on a bed of oatmeal and oak spice.  On the palate, the grapefruit pith balances out the white peach and ginger spice with hints of savoury nuttiness.  The creamy lees texture and its crisp acidity brings out an elegant and intensely flavoured lingering finish that leaves you thanking Zephyr for her favours.

Enjoy!

Rating: 96 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 13.2%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $60

Tasted: February 2021

Supplied by Singlefile as a guest panelist for their release. It was delicious and is thus highlighted.

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #358

2019 L.A.S Vino TNT Touriga Nacional Tinta Cao, Margaret River, Western Australia

Wagner’s 1876 opera, Götterdämmerung, is the last of the four musical and theatrical masterpieces that are better know as the The Ring of the Nibelung or the Ring for short.  This cycle tells the story of the killing of Siegfried by Hagen with a stab in the back.  Of course, this is not the first time such a killing has occurred.  Consider the infamous events of the 15th of March, known as the Ides of March.  Nowadays, it is celebrated as International Stab Someone in the Back Day.  Before you contemplate undertaking such an act, best to grab a red and ponder your options.  TNT might be one of those options to help you to work it through.

The 2019 L.A.S Vino TNT Touriga Nacional Tinta Cao is from Margaret River in Western Australia.  It is a bight purple coloured wine that is served from a squat little bottle that takes two hands to pour.  This has a simple and attractive nose with blackberries, spice and, as the nursery rhyme goes, all things nice.  The palate is one of bright dark fruits.  It is full-flavoured with blueberries, blackberries, spices, nutmeg and cinnamon.  A mouthfeel that is wrapped in fine powdery tannins that are balanced by dusty notes driving a lovely persistence that is worthy of sipping on while following the fourth cycle to its bloody conclusion. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 90 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 14.5%

Drink: Now; 3-5 yrs

Price: $25

Tasted: February 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #357

2016 S.C. Pannell Nebbiolo, Adelaide Hills, South Australia 

International Nebbiolo Day is celebrated on the 5th March.  Barolo in Piedmont, Italy, is the original home. The Nebbiolo grape is now considered one of the 18 noble grapes, a term given to those varieties that are internationally recognisable.  It’s original style is of a wine that is light in colour belying its power.  High in tannins and acid, it is also highly aromatic and flavoured, and worthy of cellaring. Nebbiolo is also now making its name in Australia and Adelaide Hills is a region of note.

The 2016 SC Pannell Nebbiolo from Adelaide Hills in South Australia is a light red in colour with an intense brightness.  A delicate perfumed nose of roses, leather, cherries and cranberries. Minerals, cedar and earthenware with a touch of gaminess add depth and complexity – this built with time in the glass.  The palate is of cranberries and a touch of cherries entwined in soft aniseed flavoured leather.  The tannins are grippy, akin to 240 sandpaper but in a good way.  The acid is sharp and flavours are light, yet intense and complex.  And the persistence is gloriously noble, worthy of celebrating on its namesake day. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 95 pts

Closure: Screwtop

Alc: 14%

Drink: Now; 10+ yrs

Price: $60

Tasted: March 2021

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #356

2019 Mac Forbes EB57 Concrete Schoolyard Pinot Noir, Yarra Junction, Yarra Valley, Victoria 

Mac Forbes’s approach to winemaking starts in the vineyard.  As he states, “the vines are only as good as the soil they are anchored in.”  And with this, he works with the constraints of the seasons.  His EB – Experimental Batch – range is a place for play.   The vinification of the EB57 uses a concrete fermenter and concrete for maturation over 11 months.  No oak is used.  What we get to see with great clarity is the soil being expressed through the grapes of that season. 

The 2019 Mac Forbes EB57 Concrete Schoolyard Pinot Noir is from the Yarra Junction sub-region within Yarra Valley in Victoria.  A delightful bright deep pink to pale ruby coloured wine.  The nose is playful and highly perfumed with red fruits.  It draws you in.  The palate is an array of red fruits that builds on a bed of ethereal tannins.  It is expressive, simple, complex and playful all at once. 

Enjoy!

Rating: 94 pts

Closure: Cork

Alc: 12%

Drink: Now; 3-10 yrs

Price: $40

Tasted: December 2020

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #355

2019 Soumah Syrah, Yarra Valley, Victoria

International Syrah Day appears to have got lost this year.  Celebrated on the 16th of February, it seems to have slipped most of us by.  Perhaps it was the hangover of the romance of the 14th or was it Global Drink Wine Day on the 18th. Perhaps it was due to the relatively limited use of the term Syrah that is used to adorn the bottle of our choice?  Better known Downunder as Shiraz, Syrah is in fact being observed more and more as the grape that formed the wine in the bottle on the shelf.  It’s use is more an attempt to describe a style; cooler climate with French oak.  In the end, it is a great demonstration of the versatility of the grape and this is what deserves to be celebrated on the 14th, 16th and 18th of February.   

The 2019 Soumah Syrah from the Yarra Valley in Victoria is a bright dark cherry colour in the glass. On the nose, the perfumed spices of St Valentine hang over delightfully along with touches of vanilla, herbs, blueberries and cedar-like pencil shavings. On the palate, Cupid strikes with a mix of blueberries and chocolate. It has leafy herbs that mingle with soft velvety tannins, delivering a highly appealing texture and a lingering finish that is worthy of its namesake day or any other day for that matter.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
AlcN/A%
DrinkNow; 5+ yrs
Price$40
TastedDecember 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #354

2018 Mayford Tempranillo, Porepunkah, Alpine Valley, Victoria

A puppy whining in its youth for company can drive you spare.  Without giving puppy raising guidance, they need to be left alone to cope by themselves.  “Let it mature with you not in spite of you,” would appear to be the mantra.  So to with Tempranillo.  From its ancestral home in Rjorca in Spain, it has taken up residence in a small vineyard near Porepunkah in Victoria.  Here it is thriving in a landscape that is dominated by Mt Buffalo and the tempering katabatic winds.

The 2018 Mayford Tempranillo from Porepunkah which sits within the Alpine Valley region of Victoria, is a deep crimson and garnet coloured wine.  The nose is highly appealing with the red fruits, cherries and figs.  The palate is built on a bed of gravelly tannins that are firm and grippy, yet elegant at the same time.  Red fruits, sarsaparilla and cherries excite with their youthful zest and persistence that confirm it is delightful now, while screaming for more time in the bottle.  It may even whine quietly in your cellar.  Be firm.  Leave it alone to cope with itself and you will be rewarded. 

Enjoy!

Rating95pts
ClosureScrewtop
Alc13.9%
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$40
TastedDecember 2020 & January 2021
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #352

2016 Yagarra Estate Ovitelli Grenache, McLaren Vale, South Australia

Counting crows is a pastime oft spent during the long dry Summer months. They argk and squawk as only they can awaiting a carcass to appear. Counting Crows is also an alternative rock music group from California. In “Mrs Potter’s Lullaby” they poetically proposition, “if dreams are like movies, then memories are films about ghosts.” I suspect they were sipping on a glass of Yangarra Grenache at the time as it can put you into a euphoric trance that is somewhere between a dream and a memory. 

The 2016 Yangarra Estate Ovitelli is a Grenache from McLaren Vale in South Australia. Fermented in large ceramic eggs, the end result is a wine that is gloriously bright light crimson coloured as it is swirled around in the glass. The nose is highly perfumed with red fruits, spices and sarsaparilla. The intensity draws you in. The palate upon sipping weaves its magic with fine textural layers intertwining the red berries and spices. Ghosts come and go as the length and flavours rise and fall in waves and persist almost beyond what is real.  As you sit back in amazement, you may find yourself quoting poetry as you count the crows. 

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
Alc14.5%
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$70
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #351

2018 Penfolds Bin 389 Cabernet Shiraz, South Australia

The greatest wines are out of the reach of most of us.  They are wines that fill your dreams.  Their costs far exceed your bank balances, or the consequences of an extravagant spend far exceed the perceived benefit to the palate experience.  Then there are wines that you look at and um and ah over.  Their price is up there, but not stratospheric.  Their reputation is right up there too,  but not at the head of the peloton.  You may have had it years ago and thought it was pretty special and it would be nice to see it again.  It may have filled a day dream, but not a night of dreams and that is absolutely okay.  Penfolds Bin 389 is one of those and a benchmark of the great Aussie blend.

The 2018 Penfolds Bin 389 is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz from the benchmark regions in South Australia.  Its colour is a vibrant display of ruby reds and purples that leaves you marvelling.  The nose is intensely youthful like the colour.  An abundance of liquorice spices, blackberries, blueberries and red fruits galore.  There is an ever so subtle oak with crushed nuts, Chinese five spices and an essence of Peking duck.  The palate presents flavours that are intense and mouthfilling.  Red, black and blue fruits play out on a bed of velvety and emery board like tannins.  It is juxtaposition between the raw and the integrated.  It is imposing and approachable.  It is rewardingly persistent transgressing your day dream to a marvellous shared experience.

Enjoy!

Rating97 pts
ClosureScrewtop
Alc14.5%
Drink10+ yrs
Price$100
TastedSeptember 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #350

Non-Vintage Sparkling Shiraz, Turkey Flat, Barossa Valley, South Australia

A BBQ is an Australian institution.  Snags, salad and steak on a paper plate, all to be eaten with one hand and an implement.  But which implement is best? What do you really need?  A fork, a spoon or a knife? A splayd of course!  Combining a fork, knife and spoon, this is the ultimate Australian invention that will see you get through the BBQ with aplomb.  Of course, the other  Australian invention you need to sip along with is Sparkling Shiraz.

The Non-Vintage Turkey Flat Sparkling Shiraz is from the Barossa Valley in South Australia.  It is an almost violently vibrant, deep magenta coloured wine that is all the more remarkable for the very fine bead.  The nose is rich and luscious with plums, blue berry fruits, spices and chocolate shining through.  A bit of Christmas cake too.  The palate has a luscious array of dark berry flavours and plums that fill the palate to overflowing.  Dark chocolate, espresso, spices and glazed fruits are presented on a super fine bead that is complimented by light sandy tannins. This is a complex and lingering sparkling wine that stands magnificently next to a splayd as one of the great Aussie inventions.

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureCrown
Alc13%
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$45
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #349

2017 Simonnet-Febvre Cesar Coteaux Bourguignons, Burgundy, France

Asterix and Obelix stories tell the tale of the Julius Caesar’s Romans and their fateful interactions with the Gauls in the territories that are now France.  Of course Getafix, the Druid, has access to a magic potion that keeps the Gauls and Romans in a semi-conflicted peace.  The potion remains a secret, but I suspect it was a blend of Pinot Noir and Argant.  An ancient variety, once thought to be introduced to France by Caesar, it was called Cesar.  It’s home is in the north of the Burgundy region.

The 2017 Simonnet-Febvre Cesar is from the Coteaux Bourguignons sub-region of Burgundy in France.  The colour is a very bright crimson and flashes as a potion drawing you in.  The nose is an elixir of cedar, cherries, secret herbs and raspberries.  The palate is driven by the herbs with raspberries and cherries.  Robust rustic tannins provide the bed for length.  The sharp acidity cries out for food and extends it out.  Perhaps best served with wild boar to keep the peace.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureCork
Alc13%
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$40
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #348

2020 Dormilona Yokel Trebbiano Pet Nat, Swan Valley, Western Australia

Trebbiano is thought to have originated in Italy and during Roman times, made its way to France.  Today it is one of the most widely grown varieties in the world, but will mostly be seen in balsamic vinegars and some fortifieds.  It was introduced into Australia in 1832 by James Busby.  From there it made its way to other regions including the  Swan Valley in Western Australia.  Naturally high in acidity, it is no surprise that it pairs well with hard cheeses and Italian dishes.  As a Petillant Naturel, its little bit of fizz adds just a bit more excitement.

The 2020 Dormilona Yokel Trebbiano Petillant Naturel, or Pet Nat for short, is from a site in the Swan Valley of Western Australia.  Poured from a clear bottle, you experience a Springtime sunset in a glass; hues of yellow and orange that excite.  Add in sprinkles of a fine bead of the Pet Nat and your interest goes up a notch.  An appealing nose with pears, apples, lemons and a touch of mandarin rind.  The palate displays the fine bead as a light fizz, deftly swirling the flavours of peach, pear and green apples.  A refreshing crispness from the acidity aides to the relaxation as the sun sets below the horizon.  Time tough for another glass as twilight lingers some moments more.

Enjoy!

Rating90 pts
ClosureCrown
Alc12.5%
DrinkNow
Price$25
TastedNovember 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #347

2018 Coldstream Hills Merlot, Yarra Valley, Victoria

Miles is the somewhat hard to love character from Sideways, a movie that almost killed the sales of Merlot.  He had some self esteem issues; best summed up when he remarked, “half my life is over and I have nothing to show for it.  Nothing.  I’m a thumbprint on the window of a skyscraper.  I’m a smudge of excrement on a tissue surging out to sea with a million tons of raw sewage.”  Ironically, his favourite wine was not allowed to be used in the movie, a Chateau Petrus Pomerol.  A Merlot.  With International Merlot Day on November 7, it is worth reflecting how good this grape can be.

The 2018 Coldstream Hills Merlot is from the Yarra Valley in Victoria.  It is a dark red coloured wine with a bright, lively edge.  The nose is of tobacco and herbs; sage and bay leaves providing the frills to the red fruits.  The palate is a perfect match to the nose with some cool elegance and slightly sandy tannins.  Tightly structured around plums and briary fruits, with chocolate through the middle, gives it volume that finishes with cedar notes.  This is very youthful and needs time, providing you with more than a smudge of excitement in a glass.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10 yrs
Price$35
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #346

2017 Paradigm Hill les Cinq Pinot Noir, Mornington Peninsula, Victoria 

“Il fait la queue du paon.”  What the?  If you use your favourite translator it comes out as something like “he faith the peacock tail”.  Again, what the?  Apply this to wine and Pinot Noir in particular, swirl the glass, sniff, take a sip and swizzle this marvellous liquid in your mouth and suddenly it all makes sense.  Of course, it is all about the flavour profile through the palate that fans like a peacock’s tail as it struts around the garden.

The 2017 Paradigm Hill les Cinq is a small section of a single vineyard plot of Pinot Noir in the Mornington Peninsula region of Victoria.  The colour is bright splay of crimsons as it is swirled in the glass.  The nose is an array of beautiful red fruits and savoury and earthy elements.  It is perfumed and lifted delivering more and more with time in the glass.  On the palate there is an abundance of raspberries, strawberries and pomegranates.  Some spices, nuts and savoury notes add complexity that excites and the silky texture fans alluring leaving you to remark “il fait la queue du paon.” 

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$90
TastedOctober 2020
Alc12.5%
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #345

2019 Coldstream Hills Deer Farm Vineyard Pinot Noir, Yarra Valley

November 29 is World Ballet Day and at first glance you might think there is not much in common between this artistic pursuit and wine.  Take the Arabian scene from The Nutcracker.  Dancers with excellent training are the fruit.  The music and lighting is the textural backdrop of the oak and an expert choreographer is the winemaker putting all the parts together for us to enjoy.  Get any of the elements out of balance and you end up disappointed or at worst, falling asleep with the wine spilling down your shirt front and onto the couch.  

The 2019 Coldstream Hills Deer Farm Vineyard Pinot Noir is a single vineyard site from the Yarra Valley in Victoria.  The lighting backdrop splays a lovely crimson across the stage as the dancers enter.  The music starts with the aromas moving alluringly above the glass; perfumed rose petals, sour cherries, cranberries, and raspberry red fruits pirouette expertly into fouettés with a sprinkling of cedar and spice.  As the mood deepens, the cherries, cranberries and briary fruits port-de-bras in unison. The smokiness and oak spices grand jeté over the tight acidity and silken tannins, performing a seamless manège sequence delivering a finish that is worthy of a standing ovation.  Encore!

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$50
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #344

Non Vintage House of Arras Brut Elite Cuvée No. 1501 Methode Traditionelle, Tasmania

October 19 is Champagne Day.  What a great day to recognise the euphoric elixir that is a sparkling white or pink shaded wine.  This day ignores the fact that the English invented the Methode Traditionelle of which, yes the French perfected.  It also ignores all the wines around the world, particularly those of Tasmania, that are made using Methode Traditionelle.  So, I am starting a campaign to change Champagne Day to become Methode Traditionelle Day.  Use #MethodeTraditionelleDay to show your support.

The Non Vintage Arras Brut Elite Cuvée No. 1501 Methode Traditionelle is a blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay with a splash of Pinot Meunière from vineyards in Northern Tasmania.  It is a beautiful deep yellow straw with a fine persistent bead that is a hallmark of Methode Traditionelle.  The nose is complex with perfume of white flowers and rose petals including intense flavours of stone fruits, peach in particular.  The palate has a beautiful flavour profile and mouthfeel showcasing the peach with just a hint of apricots, red berries, nougat and brioche.  The bead and acidity is glorious and a perfect Methode Traditionelle to be celebrated on #MethodeTraditionelleDay.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureCork
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$40
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #343

2018 Duke’s Magpie Hill Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Porongurup, Western Australia

Frost is a killer of crops and farming ingenuity can help manage this exposure.  The best though, is a site that has a natural buffer, and the sub-region of Porongurup in the Great Southern wine region of Western Australia is one.  Firstly, the Great Southern area is influenced by the Indian Ocean to the west and the Southern Ocean to the south and east.  Sea breezes can work their way inland to provide cooling relief in the Spring and Summer ripening months and warming influences in early Spring.  The Porongurup  area is towards the eastern boundary sitting above Albany and beside Mt Barker.  Granite knobs and eucalypt forests dominate a sloping landscape.  With vineyards located on the slopes, a naturally created thermal blanket reduces the risk of frost as the warm air slides down pushing the cold air down.

The 2018 Duke’s Magpie Hill Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon is from the sub-region of Great Southern’s Porongurup in Western Australia.  The colour is a lively and vibrant amalgam of dark dark reds and purples.  On the nose, cassis shines brightly with herbs of sage and bay leaf.  Touches of capsicum and hints of snap beans are complimented by a light seasoning of cedary oak.  The palate is classy and elegant with intense cassis, supported by mulberries and forest floor berries.  The herbs are subtle, the dark chocolate is glorious and the cedary oak is restrained deliciously on a bed of firm powdery tannins.  This has some time ahead of it if you are game.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$35
TastedOctober 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #342

2017 Wynns Coonawarra Estate Black Label Cabernet Sauvignon, Coonawarra, South Australia

Eric Carle’s The Hungry Caterpillar was first published in 1969.  A simple story, of 22 pages, tells a tale of a caterpillar that is hungry, very hungry.  Working his way through an apple on Monday, two pears on Tuesday, three plums on Wednesday, four strawberries on Thursday and five oranges on Friday.  “But he was still hungry.”  Do you remember it now?  He gets a stomach arch on Sunday after a self indulgent Saturday.  What is not well know is that the editor in chief rejected two pages that feature the caterpillar sipping upon a glass of Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon to accompany the leaf that was consumed on Sunday where he felt much better.  Here is an early draft of the two pages minus the illustration.

In the light of the setting sun, the hungry caterpillar raised a glass of 2017 Wynns Coonawarra Estate Black Label Cabernet Sauvignon from the Coonawarra district in South Australia.  It was a dark glorious red colour with bright purple hues flashing before his  multifaceted eyes.  Raising the glass to his nose, he noticed one piece of cassis, two bay leaves, three bushels of tobacco and four blueberries.  With a sip, he tasted five crumbs of dark chocolate, six rolled leaves of tobacco and seven bunches of herbs.  The tannins were too numerous for him to count with a fine firm sandy mouthfeel.  The palate was an elegant and expressive counterbalance to the leaf and he felt much better.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$35
TastedSeptember 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #341

2019 Kalleske Old Vine Grenache, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Captain Jack Sparrow is a fictional character from the Pirates of the Caribbean series of movies.  He meanders his way through the movies in a way that affects all.  He is a trickster who appears drunken.  He uses wit and deceit to end disputes and he is shrewd, calculating and eccentric to say the least.  Whilst a pirate may lean towards rum, I reckon Jack Sparrow is a lover of Grenache for this is a grape that has meandered its way through time having arrived in our land in 1832.  How would he describe a Grenache?  Of course, he would have outwitted the owner out of a world class bottle.

This is the 2019 Kalleske Old Vine Grenache from vines planted in 1935 on the Kalleske farm located in the Barossa Valley, South Australia.  It reminds you that not all gold and silver is treasure, mate.  Now bring me this horizon with a nose that is perfumed with red fruits and liquorice.  Oh all these beautiful mermaids, the seasoning of vanilla, spices and coriander root mingles with juniper berries make you raise your fist in the air and calling out ‘arr!’  On the palate, methinks this is a blend of liquorice, red fruits, sarsaparilla and rhubarb.  The tannins are emery board like dancing lightly with touches of cedar.  Arr, the flavours build, reminding you that if you choose to lock your heart away you’ll lose it for certain.  With this in my veins, my spirit will live on.

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$50
TastedSeptember 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #340

2019 Kalleske Greenock Shiraz, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Perforce is a word not oft used.  A shame, as it is an elegant word that just by saying it, you understand its intent in expressing a necessity or even the inevitable.  It might even mean a glass of Kalleske.  Year in year out, the team team works tirelessly for us to enjoy the outcomes of their work in the vineyard and the winery.  Tasting their eighteenth release of the Greenock Shiraz is an experience that leaves you thinking you, perforce, I need some more.

The 2019 Kalleske Greenock Shiraz is from a single vineyard site in Greenock, a sub-district of the Barossa valley in South Australia.  It is a deep and bright purple red which, perforce, is instantly appealing.  The nose is youthfully tight and complex with an abundance of plums, dark berries, coffee beans, spices and a hint of nuts that, perforce, awakens the senses.  The palate is vibrant with sweet black fruits and spices. The plums are glorious. The coffee is expressive and the dark chocolate mouth coating. Charcuterie is there too, interwoven with firm velvety tannins sustaining the flavours for an extended time.  It is robust and elegant in one, perforce, you will desire a second glass.

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$45
TastedAugust 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #339

2018 Yangarra King’s Wood Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South Australia

One of the tales of the Game of Thrones that is yet to be told is that of the bastard of Robert Baratheon who was conceived in the King’s Wood.  Ironically of course, our Robert was killed by a boar whilst hunting for white hart in this very wood.  Back to our bastard; Edward was his name.  A long line of Edwards ensued with one emigrating to Australia where he was affectionately referred to as Ted. He developed a deep understanding of the King’s Wood and an obsession for the Holden Kingswood.  According to Westerosi law, the surname given to the bastards of the King’s Wood was Bullpit.

The 2018 Yangarra King’s Wood Shiraz from McLaren Vale in South Australia is a deep dark black red in colour that would match the velour seating of the prestige Kingswood.  The nose is highly aromatic with earthy savoury tones meeting sweet black fruits, hints of walnuts and sprinkles of vanilla and cedar oak influences.  The palate is highly concentrated with those sweet intensely flavoured black fruits and spices dangling with elegance.  Cedar, nuts and earthy notes entwine with sandy tannins to deliver a palate experience that would see Ted crying out something like “what a bloody King’s Wood”!

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$52
TastedAugust 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #338

2018 Ravensworth Shiraz Viognier, Murrumbateman, New South Wales

Cote-Rotie is a sub-region in the northern area of Cote du Rhone.  This region thrives on a continental climate that is famous for its blend of Shiraz, a red grape, and Viognier, a white grape.  A cool climate region that experiences cool to cold wet winters, the best vineyards are located on steep sloping sites.  Murrumbateman is a sub-region within the Canberra district that experiences cold winters that are intermittently wet.  It is about 150km from the coast so marginally continental, with slopes abutting the Southern Tablelands that are renowned for sheep production.  The Shiraz Viognier is taking hold in this region with some fine examples for us to share.

The 2018 Ravensworth is a blend of Shiraz and Viognier from the Murrumbateman sub-region of the Canberra district.  The colour is an amazingly bright crimson that draws you in.  The nose is all about spices, peppers, blackberries, apricots and hints of nuts and nougat.  The palate is all about the coolness and elegance of the red fruits, raspberry being the highlight, and cherries.  The spices are lifted and the tannins are velvety.  The flavours are akin to waves, perhaps of the sloping land in which it was crafted. The persistence is glorious and the structure delightful. Grab some while you can.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$35
TastedAugust 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #337

2019 Tonic Grenache, Clare Valley / McLaren Vale, South Australia

Tonic can be defined in its adjectival form as “giving a feeling of vigour and well-being.”    As a noun, tonic is defined as “a medicinal substance taken to give a feeling of vigour or well-being.”  Calling a winery Tonic therefore comes with some serious strings attached.  Either you are a giver or a medicinal substance.  There can be no in between.  With Grenache, this is even truer.

The 2019 Tonic Grenache is a blend of Clare Valley and McLaren Vale in South Australia.  It is a crimson coloured wine with swirls of brightness.  The nose is highly perfumed with red fruits, aniseed (or was that fennel), marzipan and nougat like aromas.  The palate sees the red fruits, herbs and spice with touches of plums come shining through instilling a sense of well-being.  The tannins are fine and sandy driving a persistence that becomes a catalyst that gives you an understanding as to why this winery is called Tonic.  This Grenache from Tonic is a tonic to beat all tonics. 

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$32
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #336

2018 Bangor Vineyard Shed Captain Spotswood Pinot Noir, Tasmania

Captain Spotswood was granted land in 1831 as a retired army office and thus became the area’s first settler. This land became known as Bangor in Tasmania. His house was regarded as a respectable building, sited perfectly for the views of Norfolk Bay. During his toiling, the Captain regarded the land as third rate, best suited to wheat, turnips and potatoes. Today, this site is now planted to Pinot Noir. With International Pinot Noir Day approaching on 18 August 2020, you have time to sail to Norfolk Bay and grab a Pinot Noir to celebrate this most magnificent of days and tip a glass to Captain Spotswood as you do.

The 2018 Bangor Vineyard Shed Captain Spotswood is a Pinot Noir from the geographic wine region of Tasmania. In the glass as it is swirled, a light crimson splashes lazily around. The nose is perfumed with rose petals and bright spices. Red fruits and cherries lift with air as the sails fill on the horizon. On the palate, the red fruits mingle with rhubarb and cherries; not a turnip in sight. Savoury and earthy notes sit easily against the silky tannins. Vibrant acidity plays out the long fanning finish leaving you to marvel at this grape and the toiling of nigh on 200 years.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$34
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #335

2018 S.C. Pannell Old McDonald Grenache, McLaren Vale, South Australia

Grenache at one point was looking like forever being something you threw in with Shiraz and Mataro (or Mouvedre as it perhaps should be called). To this point, I was fascinated to hear that there had been no significant plantings of Grenache for the last 40 years. And, to think that these marvellous bush vines produce just 6% of the annual production from the McLaren Vale is something to ponder. So, when you taste a Grenache that is handled by a magician in the winery like Steven Pannell, you really wonder why this wonderful grape is not more widely planted.

The 2018 S.C. Pannell Old McDonald is a single vineyard Grenache from McLaren Vale in South Australia. The bush vines are older than 70 years and this year have produced a bright bright crimson coloured wine that swirls alluringly and magically in the glass. The nose is elegant and intense with Turkish Delight like aromas, rose water, raspberries, dried herbs and floral spices. The palate is a performance with its refined delicacy balancing the intense red fruits against a backdrop of tar and emery board like tannins. The acidity is taut and the persistence is enticing, leaving you wondering why there is not more.

Enjoy!

Rating96 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$60
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #334

2019 Jim Barry Assyrtiko, Clare Valley, South Australia

Santorini Island in the middle of the Mediterranean and Clare Valley in South Australia don’t have a lot in common at first glance.  One is an island of volcanic rock that experiences about 370 mm rainfall in any one year, while the other is a valley in the middle of a brown land that experiences around 600 mm rainfall.  Millenia ago, a grape variety evolved on the island and thrived.  A few years ago, this grape was introduced to the brown land and is thriving.  Assyrtiko is that grape.  A white discovered on a holiday that is now finding its way into our homes.

The 2019 Jim Barry Assyrtiko from Clare Valley in South Australia is a bright pale lemon coloured wine.  The nose, you might say, has a Mediterranean twist with its mineral and salty nuance, and influences of crisp lemon. A crusted oyster shell and zestiness of grapefruit complement these aromas nicely.  On the palate there are green olives along with lemons and minerals, leaping across a textural bed with a saline edge rounded out by its crisp acidity.  Not much in common, but what they have is great. 

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-7 yrs
Price$30
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #333

2018 d’Arenberg The Thunderstep Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South Australia

Australia’s National Shiraz Day has finally been declared.  July 23 is now a date for us to rejoice forever more.  All we need is a patron.  Sir Leslie Colin Patterson I hear has been suggested.  As a former cultural attaché and Chairman of the Australian Cheese Board, he would appear to have all the credentials that are more than a match for this great grape.  Like Shiraz, Sir Les is mate of the Australian taxpayer.  He has a personality like no other.  So, on this great day, a McLaren Vale Shiraz is a worthy showcase, encased in a cylindrical form.

The 2018 d’Arenberg The Thunderstep Shiraz is from the McLaren Vale in South Australia.  The colour is a proudly strutting dark red with flashes of black.  Sir Les would raise the glass to his not so insignificant nose and declare this to be a damn site better than a tie.  It is perhaps as robust as McLaren Vale can be with bold red berries and spices wafting thunderously from the glass.  The palate too is more than a match with its seductive dark fruits and earthy mineral flavours.  The tannins roar as the flavours linger with Sir Les boldly stating Shiraz is a well liked bastard and The Thunderstep is no failure.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$40
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #26

2009 Tyrrells Rufus Stone Shiraz, Heathcote, Victoria

One from the archives of 2012…While watching the London Olympics in full swing it seemed appropriate that a wine with ties to Great Britain and an Olympic sport be honoured as a “Wine Code Breaker” (originally published as “Wine of the Week”).  On the 2nd August 1100, Sir Walter Tyrrell fired an arrow at a stag. Unfortunately, this arrow struck an oak tree altering its flight striking William II, King of England (surname Rufus) in the chest killing him instantly. Over time, the oak tree was felled and a stone now marks the spot of this fateful hunting trip and is known as the Rufus Stone. William II was not a popular monarch in his day and even now, nigh on a millennium later, much suspicion remains over the cause of his death. Sir Walter’s history is not widely known; however, it is thought his descendants eventually migrated to Australia and created the Tyrrells winery, one of the oldest family owned and celebrated Australian wineries to this day.

Tyrrell’s Rufus Stone range celebrates wines from outside of their home in the Hunter Valley in NSW. The Heathcote region in Victoria is evolving into one of the most stunning regions in our vast continent for Shiraz. The 2009 Heathcote Rufus Stone Shiraz has an intense bright colour. Aromas of plums, dark berry and herbal fruits and dark chocolate; intensity driving interest. The palate is dark and lively with expressive plummy spice fruits. Mocha, herbs, coffee and vanilla beans add complexity. A viscous brooding texture leaves you wanting more. Fortunately the palate length makes this gap between sips a relatively painless experience.

Pairing the Heathcote Rufus Stone Shiraz with slain stag? I won’t know. Pairing it with watching the archery at the Olympics? A Gold medal experience.

Enjoy!

Rating92 pts
ClosureScrewtop
Drink3-10 yrs
Price$17 (at tasting)
TastedAug 2012
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #332

2016 Blue Poles Allouran Merlot Cabernet Franc, Margaret River, Western Australia

Blue Poles is an abstract painting by Jackson Pollock that was purchased by the National Gallery of Australia in 1973 for a lazy $1.3 million.  A controversial purchase it was and today, this painting, originally titled Number 11, is valued at over $350 million. This controversy inspired the naming of the winery Blue Poles, a small enterprise based in Western Australia. 

The 2016 Blue Poles Allouran is a blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc from Margaret River in Western Australia.  Not a hint of blue in the dark reds and blacks that abstractly swirl in the glass.  On the nose there are perfumed violets, herbs of sage and bay leaves, cassis and blueberries that splash against the canvas.  The palate has strokes of red and blue fruits, along with brushes of savoury and herbal notes.  The plushness and tightness of tannins are firm and powdery that seemingly linger longer than the controversy of the purchase.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 5-10 yrs
Price$30
TastedJun 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #331

2015 Rockford Basket Press, Barossa Valley, South Australia

It would be fair to say that the history of the wine press is as old as wine itself.  The original was no doubt the humble human foot.  The most notable evolution was the development of the basket press during Medieval times (or thereabouts).  Essentially, this was a wooden slatted basket with a lid that could be lowered using a large screw to exert pressure on the grapes and squeeze out the juice, gently.  Too soft and your wine is pale and insipid.  Too hard and your wine will be too tannic and harsh tasting. Mechanical improvements have continued over time, but the principles remain true.  Also, the use of a basket press in its traditional form adds to the hand made nature to the liquid within.  The most famous Australian wine that references basket press as its name is from Rockford, a very traditional wine making team, presenting the best a season can show in a very traditional bottle.

The 2015 Rockford Basket Press is a blend of Shiraz from the subregions within Barossa Valley in South Australia.  It is a medium purple to deep garnet coloured wine that is nothing short of exciting to look at.  The nose, with swirling and air, is a basket full of aromas including coffee, spices, blueberries, touches of Christmas cake, baking spices, boysenberry, liquorice and black pepper.  On the palate, it is the deft pressing that delivers intensity of the plums and black berry fruits that excels and excites.  A little touch of figs along with spices and liquorice adds to the complexity.  A well crafted layering is interlaced with the velvety tannins, delivering a stunningly persistent finish that will see this wine live on for a very long time.

Enjoy!

Rating97 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$100
TastedJuly 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #330

2019 Paralian Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South Australia

2019 Paralian Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South AustraliaThe oldest democracy by the sea is the land they call Greece.  The Paralians were the Greek people who lived on the Athenian coast in the 6th Century BC and today this is a term to describe someone who lives by the sea.  The oldest landscape by the sea is perhaps the McLaren Vale region in South Australia.  Stands to reason that a vineyard located in a democratic land would call itself Paralian. 

The 2019 Paralian Shiraz from McLaren Vale in South Australia is a vibrant purple coloured wine that cannot help but stand out.  The nose is an abundance of vibrant plums covered with ocean spray, which is balanced by this delicacy of violets wafting on a light sea breeze.  Sprinkles of blueberries pierced with chocolate chards of ancient times and earthenware jars of coffee, liquorice and oak spices.  The palate has a vibrancy of dark fruits, including an inkiness of an old parchment.  There is a mineral complexity in amongst the fruit and oak.  The flavours are presented on a sea of velvet with peeling waves of acidity that drive a persistence that would test the sailing vessels of the 6th Century BC.  This one has my vote.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$46
TastedJune 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #328

Non-vintage Pirie Sparkling, Tasmania

The first apple tree was planted by William Bligh in 1788.  This was also the first apple tree planted in Australia.  For Tasmania, apples became an important industry with exports these crisp and crunchy balls of joy being exported to countries far and wide.  It was at its peak that Tasmania became affectionately known as the Apple Isle.  Grapes were also planted in Tasmania by William Bligh in that same year.  Turning those grapes into sparkling wine has taken much longer to get started with the first made in 1984. Today it has been quoted as running rings around many sparkling wines from Champagne.  Matured yet? Perhaps not, but we can enjoy the journey.

The Pirie Sparkling is a Non-Vintage blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from Tasmania.  A lightly golden coloured wine with a fine bead persisting.  The nose has peaches, floral nose and light touches of red berries.  This is complemented by the aroma of vegemite on lightly toasted bread.  The palate has hints of peaches, red berries and yeast of baked bread and red apples, more Pink Lady than Delicious.  Crisp acidity and a fine beady mousse provides a beautiful textural platform that supports its persistence of flavours.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureCork
DrinkNow; 2-4 yrs
Price$30
TastedMay 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #327

2017 First Creek Shiraz, Hunter Valley, New South Wales

The Hunter Valley wine region in New South Wales is Australia’s oldest.  It tends to get lost when compared to the volumes out of the other regions across the country.  What is remarkable, is that the Hunter Valley produces <1% of the nations crush.  The leading red wine of this warm climate region is the Shiraz.  The style is not a blockbuster, more of a medium bodied wine that is good now, but delightful much later.

The 2017 First Creek Shiraz from the Hunter Valley in New South Wales is a vibrant purple that flashes brightly.  The nose has red berries, touches of leather and citrus zest, floral elements and herbs of cardamoms and bay leaves.  The palate has those red berries coming through, with flecks of plums, spices and herbs. Its texture is grainy which combines with the acidity to deliver a remarkable persistence and longevity for the price.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$20
TastedApr 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #287

2014 Devil’s Lair Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, Western Australia

One from the archives of 2019…One of the earliest sites evidencing human occupation in Australia is named as Devil’s Lair.  Located in the southwest of Western Australia, it is a large single-chamber cave that has had artefacts discovered dating back around 50,000 years.  To help us remember this important site, there is also a winery from the area called Devil’s Lair.  As a producer of fine wine from the Margaret River, it pays homage to the land, seasons and history of the area as well as providing a respectful nod to our ancient land and peoples.

2014 Devil’s Lair Cabernet Sauvignon from the Margaret River district in Western Australia is a purple garnet coloured wine that flashes brightly in a torch lit cave.  The nose wafts on a gentle breeze with fresh green beans, cassis, capsicum and herbal notes including tobacco (as this is world no tobacco day, it should be noted that this is appropriate tobacco).  There are also touches of chocolate and mint, but not choc mint as this is too strong a reference.  Does that make sense?  On the palate, the cassis really shines through; bold and elegant with complexing red fruits and herbs.  The cedary oak is well balanced throughout and this delivers a wonderful persistence of flavours across a bed of fine sandy tannins.  Whilst it may not last 50,000 years, it will continue to evolve gracefully over the next 50,000 hours.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 19+ yrs
Price$55
TastedMay 2019

Please feel free to pass this on to your friends and ask them to subscribe so they to can receive a regular Wine Code Breaker! Add the email address and hit subscribe.

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #326

2018 Singlefile Family Reserve Chardonnay, Great Southern, Western Australia

Zephyr is the name of one of the four humanoid characters of the Elementals as featured in the Marvel Comics.  As the Mistress of the Winds, Zephyr had the power to control the wind, sky and air to create havoc.  It is a sad story of betrayal for Zephyr was eventually defeated by Ms Marvel (aka Carol Danvers).  A zephyr, of course, is also a soft gentle breeze that is in stark contrast to the hell-raising of its humanoid form.  These gentle breezes are a key feature of the Denmark region in the Great Southern wine region of Western Australia.  And it is this feature that provides a positive influence on Chardonnay from this region.  

The 2018 Singlefile Family Reserve Chardonnay is from a single vineyard in the Denmark area of Great Southern in Western Australia.  It is a light golden-coloured wine with a brightness that delights. The nose presents peaches, grapefruit, oatmeal and touches of cashews, lifting it up on a gentle breeze.  On the palate this breeze becomes blustery in a good way, with gusts of grapefruit, waves of peaches and flashes of savoury nuttiness on the back palate.  It is a taught and texturally layered palate with lees and nougat.  Unlike the comics, the oak influences and crisp acidity finishes this off beautifully, knowing there is more in the bottle to relive the experience.

Enjoy!

Rating94 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$55
TastedApr 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #281

2013 Mitchelton Print Series Shiraz, Central Victoria, Victoria

From the archives of 2019…How can you produce great wine in an area that is considered to be a warm climate region and experiences less than 600 mm rainfall in an average year?  In many parts of the world this would be considered a desert.  The Nagambie Lakes district that forms a sub-region of Central Victoria is just such a region.  As we all know, no water equals no vines equals no grapes equals no wine.  Fortunately, this little patch benefits from the underground water table that sneaks through the region as fed by the rainfall in far away regions.  Another benefit of this region is the sandy soils that the vines stand up in as they have remained largely untouched by phylloxera.  With great care, the red grapes from this region produce wines that are full bodied, boldly structured and marvelously flavoured.  

The 2013 Mitchelton Print Series Shiraz from Central Victoria in Victoria is a brightly coloured crimson with loads of appeal as it is swirled around the glass.  The nose is complex to say the least with plums, spice and black fruits in abundance leaping out of  the glass.  Hints of chocolate, more milk than dark, with alluring vanilla bean notes adding subtlety.  The palate equally matches the nose for complexity and fruit flavours.  Brambly blackberries with coffee and liquorice blend neatly with the bold yet velvety tannins.  All in all it delivers a wonderfully textured wine with depth and persistence that gets close to matching the depth of the roots sneaking through the sandy soils in search of precious water that rarely falls from the sky.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$80
TastedApr 2019

Please feel free to pass this on to your friends and ask them to subscribe so they to can receive a regular Wine Code Breaker! Add the email address and hit subscribe.

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #325

2018 Warramate Chardonnay, Yarra Valley, Victoria

Did you know that the 20th of May is World Bee Day? This day pays homage to the role of bees and other pollinators of the ecosystems of our world. Just think what we would struggle to find without bees. Almost 75% of the world’s food crops require pollination from a bee or other pollinator. Then there is about 35% of the worlds agricultural land requiring bees and other pollinators to thrive. Without the pollination of the Chardonnay buds by bees, we would be missing out on celebrating World Chardonnay Day on the 21st May. Coincidence? I think not.

The 2018 Warramate Chardonnay is from vines pollinated by bees from the Yarra Valley in Victoria.  The wine is largely clear with an ever so lightly nectar coloured tinge.  The nose buzzes with pink grapefruit, poached peaches and apples, lemon zest, touches of pears and nashy fruit.  On the palate the citrus stings and stone fruits soothe. Poached peach with the fresh lees and cashews balances the crisp acidity to deliver a persistence to is an ode to bees of past, present and future.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-5 yrs
Price$28
TastedMay 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #324

2018 Mr Riggs Piebald Syrah, Adelaide Hills, South Australia

Piebald is usually used in reference to a horse that has irregular patches of two colours; mostly black and white.  Of course, this is now not the case and piebald can be used to describe anything or anyone who happens to be composed of or looking like they are of two contrasting colours.  CS Lewis was perhaps the most prolific user of this term as evidenced by his book Perelandra.  Ransom, the main character and for those in the know will recall how the green lady laughed and capered with mirth at the site of his piebald statue.  As a reference for a wine; it just means “yum”.

The 2018 Mr Riggs Piebald Syrah from Adelaide Hills in South Australia is partially piebald being mostly a bright garnet leading to a purple coloured rim of its youth.  Its nose becomes multi-piebald with cooler climate spices, cherries and plums, a touch of roast meat, herbs, liquorice and intense spices.  Dark berries of black berries, boysenberries, blueberries and forest floor brambly berries are there with air and a bit of cherry pie and cream adds profound interest.  The palate excels with a multi-hued flavour profile that is intense and persistent.  Floating on a bed of fine velvety tannins, driven by an elegantly structured acid delivers a wine that is delightfully piebald; no shades of grade.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$24
TastedMay 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #323

2019 Kalleske Plenarius Viognier, Barossa Valley, South Australia

The autumn sunsets are amazing.  The sky is clear, leaving orange hues splaying upwards as the golden orb disappears below the horizon.  You cannot help but smile in wonder.  It would therefore seem reasonable to test out an orange style wine.  These are white wines that are made a little bit like a red wine.  The grapes are crushed and fermented on the skins for a period of time.  This is where the colour comes from.  You look at the colour and it is polarising in how different it looks.  They are a style that you either love or hate.  If you never give it a go, you will never know which side of the sunset you are on.

The 2019 Kalleske Plenarius is a Viognier orange style from the Barossa Valley in South Australia.  The colour is of a classic autumnal sunset with its slightly burnt orange hue. The nose is highly aromatic with marmalade and floral notes and kumquats, stone fruits, and lemon zest.  Lychees burst forth as if the shell has been freshly pierced.  On the palate, the marmalade on toast blends with the funkiness of the skin contact.  It is rustic, textural, grippy, oily, and earthy, with each melding together to splay flavours into the sky and leave a smile of wonderment on your face.

Enjoy!

Rating92 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow
Price at tasting$30
TastedApr 2020
Featured

Wine Code Breaker #322

2017 Gemtree Uncut Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South Australia

Obi-Wan Kenobi known, as old Ben, watched over the young Luke Skywalker and then guided him in the use of the Force. As old Ben explained to the young Luke, “the Force is what gives a Jedi his power. It’s an energy field created by all living things. It surrounds us and penetrates us. It binds the galaxy together.” What is not well know is that old Ben guided Luke in the use of the Force over bottles of McLaren Vale Shiraz. For us, we are fortunate that one of old Ben’s lessons as survived a transit from a galaxy far far away.

Luke, use the Force and feel the label for it is the 2017 Gemtree Uncut Shiraz from McLaren Vale in South Australia. Remember, only a Sith deals in absolutes Luke, for the colour is a deep purple with reds and blacks. The truth is often what you make of it, so be careful to note that this has salty plums and spices. The aromas are gloriously delightful with a sprinkling of oak. The palate will remind you of who is the more foolish; the fool or the fool who follows him? It soars and sings with plums, dark fruits with the Force revealing a ripeness and juiciness that is balanced beyond its years. Skill is the child of patience as you note touches of chocolate, mocha and spices. The tannins are velvety and attractively defined by its acidity. Remember…the Force will be with you. Always Luke, and this one too with its long and persistent finish.

May the Force be with you, this coming Stars Wars day. May the fourth it is.

Enjoy!

Rating93 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 3-10 yrs
Price$23
TastedApr 2020

Please feel free to pass this on to your friends and ask them to subscribe so they to can receive a regular Wine Code Breaker! Add the email address and hit subscribe.

Featured

Wine Code Breaker #321

2018 Giant Steps Tarraford Vineyard Syrah, Yarra Valley, Victoria

“Jack and the Bean Stalk“ is a classic English fairy tale that contains a tetrametric poem that we all re-call with ease.  Of course, it is the monosyllabic incantation from the giant:

Fee-fi-fo-fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive or be he dead
I’ll grind his bones to make my bread.

In this fable, the giant is the villain and he took giant steps to his demise as the beanstalk came crashing down.  What is not well known is that this giant was quite fond of pairing his bread with a Giant Steps Tarraford Vineyard Syrah from the Yarra Valley in Victoria.  Not oft quoted is the second verse of his monosyllabic tetrametric warning. 

Fee-fi-fo-fum
I smell the spice and herbs and plum
Earthy edge and savoury tones
I’ll sniff and sip this with your bones.

Of course the 2018 was not available to our villain prior to his demise but it is for us.

Enjoy!

Rating95 pts
ClosureScrewtop
DrinkNow; 10+ yrs
Price$50
TastedApr 2020

Please feel free to pass this on to your friends and ask them to subscribe so they to can receive a regular Wine Code Breaker! Add the email address and hit subscribe.

Wine Code Breaker #365

2009 Castagna Sparkling Genesis Shiraz, Beechworth, Victoria

Din Djarin is better known as the Mandalorian or Mando for short. A western styled hero who wears beskar armour never shows his face to anyone. He travels through a galaxy far far away in his space craft with occasional drop ins to his favourite wine region for is preferred style, Beechworth Sparkling Shiraz. As it turns out, not only is he a master bounty hunter, he happens to have a particularly fine palate that offsets the fact that bounty hunting is a complicated business. I found one of his recent tasting notes and it is with Mando’s permission that it is published here for your benefit.

The 2009 Castagna Sparkling Genesis Shiraz from Beechworth in Victoria is a sparkling marvel that I bring in warm or cold. Served cold it is a deep brick red with a developed yet black light absorbing look about it. I am a Mandalorian. Weapons are part of my business and the fine bread streams through it like a light sabre through a droid. Upon sniffing, alone of course, I like the odds. It is scented, perfumed with liquorice spice and blackberries standing out. I recall when one chooses to walk the way of the Mandalorian, you are both hunter and prey and this palate is my prey. It is a deep and complex with black fruits, herbs, spices and just a touch of apricots. Its firm tea like tannins balance the mousse of the bead as the flavours splay with finesse and ease and linger. I’ll see you again, I promise. This is the way.

May the fourth be with you on International Star Wars Day.

Enjoy!

Rating: 96 pts

Closure: DIAM

Alc: 14%

Drink: Now; 5+ yrs

Price: $90

Tasted: December 2020